Joe Scanlon

Joe Scanlon (grandstand)

T. Joseph Scanlon
Born: January 2, 1933 (Ottawa)
Died: May 2, 2015 (Kingston, Ontario)

Joe Scanlon was a journalism professor and an expert on disaster response. A prolific writer, he published more than 200 books, chapters, articles and monographs in professional journals.

Joe Snalon (posed)The Carleton University professor taught generations of journalists, earning a reputation as a tough taskmaster who prepared students for the unforgiving world of daily journalism.

On campus, he was also known as a superfan of Carleton athletics. He wrote a history of men’s basketball at the school, as well as a history of the early football team, prepared with the assistance of a second-year journalism class. In retirement, he wrote a monthly column on Carleton sports for a community newspaper in Ottawa.

Earlier in his career, Scanlon coached the Ravens tennis team for five seasons, winning four championships. A Gold Medal-winning graduate of Carleton’s journalism school in 1955, Scanlon served as student assistant to athletics director Norm Fenn. He later managed the men’s basketball team, counselled varsity athletes, and served on the athletics board.

As a journalist, Scanlon covered both Parliament Hill and Queen’s Park for the Toronto Star, which assigned him to cover the early days of the kennedy administration as Washington correspondent. He also was a field producer and editor with CBC-TV’s flagship news program, “The National.” Scanlon joined Carleton as an assistant professor in 1965. A memorial fund in his name has been established at the university.

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